Randall Walther - Fredericksburg, VA Real Estate, Stafford, VA Real Estate, Spotsylvania, VA


500 BELMONT BAY DR #115, WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191  

$455,000
Price
2
Bedrooms
2
Baths
Remarkable end unit condo on the water-1800 sq ft-2bdrm/2bath-one level living-gourmet kitchen-9' ceilings-open floor plan w/study-rare opportunity with 2 parking spaces/2 storage units in parking garage-access to fitness center-miles of walking trails-adjacent to natural preserve area-marinas/shops on site-bike to VRE-this home will be a refuge from daily stress-enjoy the views


If this is your first time selling a home, you might not be familiar with the costs associated with selling. Lenders and agents help to make this process as simple as possible for both the buyer and seller. However, it’s still a good idea to know what to expect to pay for selling your home, as it seems counter-intuitive that you would have to pay to sell something.

Due to the consolidation of costs by lenders, it can be easy to glaze over the list of closing expenses without fully knowing what they mean. But since many fees can be negotiated, it pays to learn the ins and outs of closing costs.

Whether you’re selling your home soon or just want to brush up on real estate processes, this article will give you a better understanding of closing costs from the perspective of a seller.

Closing costs

Buyers typically pay the majority of the closing costs associated with purchasing a home. However, there are some closing costs that buyers are at least partially responsible for.

Notary fees, expenses from escrow, and title insurance are all likely costs you’ll have to dish out before closing.

Agent fees

Real estate agents typically earn a commission on selling a house. The work they put in saves you in several ways. First, you don’t have to pay for all of the marketing expenses associated with selling a home. This includes photography, sign-making, and online listings.

Agents can save you in other ways, as well. They’ll help you price your home effectively, negotiate prices, and take care of the time-intensive process of showing your house. You won’t want to have to take time off from work to try to DIY these steps.

Taxes

Since you’ve likely owned your home for a while now, you’re familiar with paying property taxes. If you pay taxes yearly and are moving toward the end of your pay cycle, you’ll have to pay a prorated rate for the amount of time you’ve lived in the home that year.

The burden is also yours for any remaining HOA fees and state transfer taxes. Not every state charges transfer taxes so be sure to check the cost for your state.

Moving costs

Moving can be an expensive endeavor. Aside from hiring movers, renting vans, or buying boxes, there are a number of expenses we don’t often think of when preparing to move.

First, it will take you a while to get your new home set up. That means you should be prepared to eat out for a while until you get settled.

On top of that, there’s also the matter of having to take days off from work, which can be costly in its own right.

Those are some of the most common expenses a buyer has to worry about during closing. Your real estate agent will be able to give you a comprehensive rundown of costs and help you find the best agreement.


Buying a house is never a simple decision. Aside from all of the financial aspects of purchasing a home, there are numerous life-related considerations you’ll need to think about. So, it comes as little surprise that diving head on into the house hunting process can be stressful and taxing to the home buyer.

With all of the different numbers to keep track of--a down payment, closing costs, credit scores, interest rates, and so on--it’s easy to get lost in the finer details of your budget. This can lead to even more stress as you try to navigate your way through getting approved for a mortgage and shopping for the perfect home.

In this article, we’re going to give you some tips on how to maintain your budget and reduce stress throughout the home buying process. That way, when you do finally find the house you’ve been waiting for, you’ll be able to move forward confidently.

Trust the process

Many first-time home buyers enter the real estate market with little knowledge or experience of how things work. Any newcomer to such a huge and complex industry is bound to be flustered with all of the different options available to them.

However, much of the home buying process is relatively standardized. Real estate agents all make roughly the same commission, lenders use similar algorithms to decide how much of a loan you’ll be approved for, and real estate contracts contain legal safeguards and contingencies to ensure that you and the seller’s interests are protected.

When shopping for a mortgage or getting pre-approved, it’s a good idea to ask friends, family, or read reviews online to find someone you know you can trust. From there, rely on the experts to lead you through the process.

Have a long-term plan

Much of the stress and anxiety around buying a home comes from the uncertainty of the future. Sitting down with your family and significant other and deciding your long-term goals for homeownership is a good way to build confidence and know that you’re making the right choice.

Determining things like location, the number of years you want to live in a home, and what priorities are the most important (school districts, neighborhood safety, etc.) will help you make that plan a reality.

Use the tools at your disposal

If you’re reading this article, you already have started to take advantage of one of the most important resources you have, the internet. Look up real estate terminology you’re unfamiliar with, read up on the different types of mortgages, and take advantage of free online calculators to create what-if scenarios to find out what you might end up paying in closing costs and interests.

It’s also a good idea to check your credit score for free online. You can check your official reports once per year, but for simple credit checks you can look it up each month for free.

Knowing that you’re in good hands with a lender and agent, that you have a basic understanding of industry terms, that you have a long-term plan, and that your finances are in order will all help set your mind at ease and give you confidence as you move forward toward homeownership.


Selling your home may prove to be a long, arduous process, particularly if you're unable to distinguish your residence from others on the housing market. Fortunately, there are many great household items that you can leave behind to differentiate your home from others and improve your chances of a quick sale.

Leaving various household items behind can serve you well in a number of ways. First, you'll be able to give homebuyers an incentive to purchase your residence if you leave custom or high-priced items that they might struggle to purchase elsewhere. You also will be able to simplify the moving process, as you won't have to worry about relocating numerous items that you leave behind when you move out of your current home.

There are many wonderful items that you can leave behind to boost your chances of a quick home sale, including:

1. Refrigerator

If your refrigerator complements your kitchen décor beautifully, it may enhance the appearance of your kitchen. Plus, this appliance could become a key component in a negotiation with a homebuyer that may make it easier for you to maximize the value of your residence.

Your refrigerator may have served you well for years, but you won't have to worry about investing substantial time and resources to move it to your new address if you leave this appliance behind. Also, if you offer your refrigerator as part of your home purchase, it may prove to be the difference between selling your home and keeping it on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

2. Big-Screen TV

The big-screen TV in your den, man cave or living room has helped transformed your ordinary living space into a fun, exciting area. Now, you'll want to consider including your big-screen TV in your home sale, as this could help you streamline the process of selling your house.

By offering your big-screen TV, you'll make it easy for a homebuyer to move in and enjoy a high-quality TV instantly. Furthermore, the big-screen TV may help a homebuyer save time and money, as he or she won't have to worry about finding a new television after purchasing your residence.

3. Washer or Dryer

Let's face it – un-installing and relocating a washer or dryer can be a time-consuming endeavor. And in some cases, you may even need to hire a plumber to perform this task properly.

Lucky for you, leaving your washer or dryer behind could prove to be mutually beneficial for you and a homebuyer.

As a home seller, you won't have to worry about allocating time and resources to move a large, heavy washer or dryer from your residence. For a homebuyer, he or she will be able to reap the benefits of a superior washer or dryer immediately.

Consider the household items that you'll leave behind before you add your house to the real estate market. By doing so, you can include these items in your home listing and improve your chances of selling your house quickly.


Choosing the right retirement home might be more important than choosing a starter home.Why? You generally buy a retirement home during your richly seasoned years. By the time you start shopping for a retirement home, the end of your work career is in view.

Amenities that can turn a retirement home into an oasis

There may be no other time in your life when you spend more time at home than during retirement. Not only are you getting your finances together, you're daydreaming about a quieter life. In fact, when you pick up the telephone and call a realtor, informing her that you want to start looking for a place to retire, you might already be counting down the remaining years left for you to work.

Because you'll likely spend most of your time in or around  your house after you retire, to appreciate your end-of-work years, pick a house that you love. Get a retirement home with these five benefits, some of the benefits and amenities are multi-purpose, and you could enjoy being at your house decades after you retire:

  • Lots of space - Large, open rooms are easy to maneuver around, reducing the chances that you will bump into another person in your house. Ample space also makes it easy to avoid bumping into furniture,cabinets and shelving.
  • Few or no steps - The fewer steps in a retirement home, the less likely it might be that you will stumble and fall. Should you experience balance challenges, not having to climb up and down steps could prevent you from getting seriously injured.
  • Large, open windows - Bay windows with amazing outdoor views turn a retirement home into an oasis. Sitting in the living room or on the front porch in such a setting can be immediately relaxing.
  • Newly installed title or hardwood floors - You won't have to worry about carpet stains with quality tile or hardwood floors. Cleaning tile and hardwood floors generally takes less work than scrubbing and steaming carpet.
  • Open floor plans - This design benefit keeps you from having to struggle with door knobs as you get older.

Get a home you love before you head into retirement

In addition to the above structure designs and amenities, go for a retirement home that has newly installed appliances and amenities. Your retirement home shouldn't force you to deplete your bank account just to finish one necessary repair after another. It also shouldn't put you at risk of slips and falls, the latter which happens more frequently as people age.

Instead of being too small, your retirement home should be large enough to accommodate family gatherings, outdoor entertainment and other social engagements. If you had children, the house should definitely make it easy and fun for your grandchildren and great-grandchildren to spend a night or weekend with you.

In a nutshell, a great retirement home has no less than five winning amenities.These winning amenities help you to feel more relaxed and alive at home than you'd feel if you spent a night at a hotel.




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